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‘We are in the second Coronavirus wave’ CS Kagwe warns as 14 die

  • CS Kagwe has warned that the country is essentially in the second wave of Coronavirus infections.
  • 68 people have succumbed to COVID-19 this week only.
  • CS Kagwe: “If they are paying Sh800 at KNH, then they can only pay Sh800 at Nairobi Women’s or Aga Khan.”

Kenya is essentially in the second wave of the Coronavirus pandemic, this is according to Health CS Mutahi Kagwe.

Speaking in Mombasa on Thursday, October 29, CS Kagwe noted that 54 people had succumbed to COVID-19 this week alone, while announcing that another 14 patients had lost their lives.

This now brings to 964 the total death toll due to COVID-19 in the country.

The total number of confirmed COVID-19 cases in the country has risen to 52,612, after 761 more people tested positive in the last 24 hours. Today’s cases were detected from a sample size of 4,830.

346 patients have also recovered from the disease bringing the total recoveries in the country to 35,604. 223 were from the Home-Based Care Program, while 123 were discharged from hospitals.

“On the first wave, the highest positivity rate, around July, was about 13%, the day before yesterday we had a positivity rate of 20.2%, yesterday we were at 15%, today we are once again at 15%…this is from a low of about 4% averrage per week in September. Clearly we have an issue to deal,” said Kagwe.

Cost of healthcare in Kenya

CS Kagwe also said that his ministry, through the National Hospital Insurance Fund (NHIF), will be seeking to reduce the cost of health care in the country, lamenting that Kenyans pay huge hospital bills in private facilities.

According to CS Kagwe, if a Kenyan seeking healthcare services at Kenyatta National Hospital (KNH) is paying Sh800, then s/he should pay the same amount Nairobi Women’s or Aga Khan.

This, Kagwe, says, will enable the country address the issue of doctors once and for all.,

“If we bring down the cost of healthcare substantially, that is the only time we can call ourselves a healthcare tourism destination. Our cost of healthcare must be equal to or less than India,” added the former Nyeri Senator.